AMERICAN PICKERS To Film In Vermont this Fall

pickers

 

Mike Wolfe, Frank Fritz, and their team are excited to return to Vermont! They plan to film episodes of the hit series AMERICAN PICKERS throughout the region this fall.

AMERICAN PICKERS is a documentary series that explores the fascinating world of antique ‘picking’ on History. The hit show follows Mike and Frank, two of the most skilled pickers in the business, as they hunt for America’s most valuable antiques. They are always excited to find sizeable, unique collections and learn the interesting stories behind them.

As they hit the back roads from coast to coast, Mike and Frank are on a mission to recycle and rescue forgotten relics. Along the way, the Pickers want to meet characters with remarkable and exceptional items.  The pair hopes to give historically significant objects a new lease on life, while learning a thing or two about America’s past along the way.

Mike and Frank have seen a lot of rusty gold over the years and are always looking to discover something they’ve never seen before. They are ready to find extraordinary items and hear fascinating tales about them. AMERICAN PICKERS is looking for leads and would love to explore your hidden treasure. If you or someone you know has a large, private collection or accumulation of antiques that the Pickers can spend the better part of the day looking through, send us your name, phone number, location and description of the collection with photos to:

americanpickers@cineflix.com or call 855-old-rust.

 

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A few tickets left!

bean-hole-extra-tickets-ad

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An unusual way to cook beans!

A fund raising and delicious old-timey way of cooking beans is being enacted at the Greenbank’s Hollow Historic Park this coming Sunday. Please join us. Call for tickets.

bean hole supper 2016

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You’re invited to a mini-bioblitz

This Saturday, June 11—and the weather looks promising!

Leader: Dave Houston

Dave Houston speaking to a group at Greenbank's Hollow.

Dave Houston speaking to a group at Greenbank’s Hollow.

On Saturday, June 11, 2016, all interested naturalists are invited to the Historic Park to gather by the covered bridge in Greenbank’s Hollow and then venture out into nearby forests, fields, wetlands, ponds and streams to discover and document the plants, birds, mammals, insects, spiders, herbs, and other life forms that exist in these ecosites.

About 16 folks have indicated that they plan to be there—that’s great, but of course, more would be welcome. If you know of anyone with special interests in fungi, mosses, liverworts, bryophytes, or lichens give them a call and invite them along. We have some good botanists coming, and some experts in butterflies and dragonflies, but other plant and insect lovers would be welcome also, as there are lots of interesting sites to check out. You generalists may have an opportunity to team up with someone if you wish.

mini bio blitz greenbank's hollow june 11 29016

A map of the four quadrants that will be part of the bioblitz. The center is the covered bridge.

I’ve worked up some maps outlining the geographic area of interest and some data sheets to help record your finds. If you can bring pencils, clipboards (I have a few), bugdope, raingear, lunch and water that would be good. Photos can often be very helpful in identifying or documenting what you find out there.

Logistics:

WHERE: Gather on the south side of Joes Brook near the covered bridge. Parking is along Brook Road, in the few designated parking spaces, and on the grassy area. Look for the small pop-up tent there with table for check in, and to pick up maps, data sheets, directions, etc.

WHEN: I will be there by 7:30 am. You can come whenever you can get there. Some of you may want to spend all day, some of you might not be able to—and that’s OK, for whatever you discover and document will add to our database.

DURING: I suggest that those not too far away, or not too engrossed in what that are finding, check back in at noon for a lunch break, discussion of the morning’s venture, and perhaps select a different venue for the afternoon.

AFTER: As I mentioned in my earlier memo, for those of you still around at the end of the day, there will be a wrap-up at my house (within the zone of interest!). Timing will depend on how things work out, but in any case, there will be beer, wine, snacks, etc., and the grill can go on for those who wish to bring something more substantial.

If you have any questions, suggestions, etc. please let me know. I hope to see you all for a fun day at the

Hollow

Directions: From the Danville Green, take the Peacham road south to Harvey’s Hollow (2 miles), turn left onto Brook Rd and go to its end—by the covered bridge,

-or- from the Green, take Brainerd Street south, and where it swings left, go straight onto Greenbank’s Hollow Rd- continue to the Hollow and the bridge.

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This postmark neophyte learned something

By Sharon Lakey, Director of the Danville Vermont Historical Society

Sharon Lakey, Lindi Pronto and Don Gallagher finishing up postmarking for Thaddeus Stevens

Sharon Lakey, Lindi Pronto and Don Gallagher finishing up postmarking for Thaddeus Stevens

Okay, I admit it; I am a postmark neophyte. When I received an email lately from Ross Hetrick, the president of the Thaddeus Stevens Society, sharing with me that someone was coming to Danville for a postmark cancellation honoring the 224th birthday of Thaddeus Stevens, I was more than a bit foggy about the whole thing. He also suggested I might want to have some items canceled at the event. Having never been a stamp or postmark collector, I had no idea what I should have canceled. Thank goodness for Google.

The idea of a special cancellation was generated by the postmaster in Danville, Lindi Pronto, who was familiar with the process as she had completed one nearly 20 years ago. She had spoken with Don Gallagher at the 2015 renaming of the Danville Post Office to the Thaddeus Stevens Post Office. Don has been on a mission for the last few years to have an actual postage stamp printed by the United States Postal Service in honor of Stevens.

For those readers who may not know, Thaddeus Stevens was born in Danville, educated in Peacham, graduated from Dartmouth and went on to become a brilliant lawyer in Pennsylvania where he became an ardent abolitionist and Congressman. He is recognized as the father of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Definitely, Stevens is a worthy subject for a postage stamp. However, it is no easy task to convince the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee of this.

As Gallagher explains it, the process of getting an actual stamp made is a long one. It requires many steps and proof of the viability of the subject. As millions of stamps will be printed, the question is, will customers really buy the stamp? There must be broad support for the individual.

To that end, Gallagher is attempting to spread the word and actually get people–yes, you reader–to do something. He would like you to write to the Stamp Committee telling them you support the effort and give your personal feelings about how important your civil rights are to you in a democracy.

Here, dear reader, is the address, and we hope you will consider sending a personal note. Your signature and date are required.

Thaddeus Stevens Stamp
Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o Stamp Development
United States Postal Service
475 L’Enfant Plaza S.W., Room 3300
Washington, DC 20260-3501

The postmark cancellation used in Danville on April 4, 2016. In this case, it was used on a postcard created for the event. These are available at the Danville Historical Society.

The postmark cancellation used in Danville on April 4, 2016. In this case, it was used on a postcard created for the event. These are available at the Danville Historical Society.

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Thaddeus Stevens special postmark, Monday April 4, 2016

Lindi Pronto, Danville postmaster, holds the Thaddeus Stevens portrait that hangs in the Danville, VT, post office. Last year, the post office was named for Thaddeus Stevens.

Lindi Pronto, Danville postmaster, holds the Thaddeus Stevens portrait that hangs in the Danville, VT, post office. Last year, the post office was named for Thaddeus Stevens.

In honor of the birthday of Thaddeus Stevens on April 4, 1792, there will be a special postmark cancellation at the Danville, VT, Thaddeus Stevens Post Office.

Stevens, who is known as the Great Commoner, was born in Danville and educated in Peacham. He was an avid believer in our democracy and the civil rights and obligations that come with citizenship. He is credited with the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution.

Those who wish to have the special postmark may bring their stamped envelope or postcard to the post office during office hours on Monday, April 4. The postmaster will also cancel mail requests for those who cannot get to Danville, as long as the request is received before April 4.

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The Railroad in Vermont

Annual Meeting 2016

Annual Meeting 2016

 

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FOSTER PAGE, A FRIEND AND RELATIVE

Foster Page driving one of his famous doodlebugs with his pals, Billy Budd and Jack. Photo taken by Yankee Magazine

Foster Page, driving one of his famous doodlebugs with his pals, Billy Budd and Jack. Photo taken by Yankee Magazine in 1984.

By Winona (Peck) Gadapee

Foster Page was a family close friend, a relative (my father Reggie Peck’s cousin), helper and enemy of none.

Foster was in my mother’s class at Danville’s Philips Academy, probably the class of 1931. He and my Dad shared equipment, much of it Foster’s, and they hayed and spread manure for each other.

My early memories of Foster were when I was perhaps eight or nine, my brother five years younger. Foster would come to our house, sit in the kitchen chair near the door to sort of visit… Foster wasn’t much of a talker. What he really wanted was to play with us kids until we were so wound my Mother would always end up sitting us in chairs for “Time Out”. Thinking back, I can imagine she was feeling stressed before we got loud, because she always had so much to do and she was “caught” in the kitchen.

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2016 Greenbank’s Burn Celebration

Please join the party–it’s fun and the weather is supposed to be fine!

greenbank's burn poster

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70 years of Sherryland

toppy sherry elder cane

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