FOSTER PAGE, A FRIEND AND RELATIVE

Foster Page driving one of his famous doodlebugs with his pals, Billy Budd and Jack. Photo taken by Yankee Magazine

Foster Page, driving one of his famous doodlebugs with his pals, Billy Budd and Jack. Photo taken by Yankee Magazine in 1984.

By Winona (Peck) Gadapee

Foster Page was a family close friend, a relative (my father Reggie Peck’s cousin), helper and enemy of none.

Foster was in my mother’s class at Danville’s Philips Academy, probably the class of 1931. He and my Dad shared equipment, much of it Foster’s, and they hayed and spread manure for each other.

My early memories of Foster were when I was perhaps eight or nine, my brother five years younger. Foster would come to our house, sit in the kitchen chair near the door to sort of visit… Foster wasn’t much of a talker. What he really wanted was to play with us kids until we were so wound my Mother would always end up sitting us in chairs for “Time Out”. Thinking back, I can imagine she was feeling stressed before we got loud, because she always had so much to do and she was “caught” in the kitchen.

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2016 Greenbank’s Burn Celebration

Please join the party–it’s fun and the weather is supposed to be fine!

greenbank's burn poster

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70 years of Sherryland

toppy sherry elder cane

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My Grandparents

By Judy (Randall) Garland

When I was little, I thought everyone had grandparents, but I found out as I got older that not everyone did. In fact some people had none and some people had only one set or one grandparent. My family was very lucky – we had two full sets of wonderful grandparents.

Grammie and Grampa Root

Grammie and Grampa Root

When I think of Grampa Root, I think of how he made one feel very special. I can still hear him cheering me on when I was little in the bike races at the 4th of July in North Danville. He was big and burly, almost a full-blooded Irishman, and I loved him.

Grammie Root was so sweet. I never heard her curse or swear. She had long flowing hair that she wore on top of her head. When she would comb it out, we were mesmerized. She would sit in a straight-back chair for hours crocheting away. Then she would give us her handiwork for Christmas, which I must say wasn’t very much appreciated at the time, but now we love her work. I don’t remember her doing anything with us but we still loved to go there.

Grampa and Grammie Randall

Grampa and Grammie Randall

We always begged my parents for a chance to go down to our other grandparents’ home, the Randalls, in St. Johnsbury in the summer. That was our vacation, and we relished it. And besides, we got out of doing dishes! We could swing on the tree swing or walk on the trail that went up through the woods. Our aunts, Betty, Gloria and Joanne, Grampa and Grammie’s youngest daughters, were there, too. Joanne especially would walk us to town when we asked her. We would walk on the cement walls at the Fairbanks Museum on our way down. I also remember getting caps for the cap guns or buy presents for the rest of the family. I remember buying Evening of Paris for my Mother. She acted like it was her favorite, but now that I smell it, it stinks!

Grampa Randall was very stoic but never lewd or lascivious. In fact, when Jini, my sister, and I were both there, she would go with Grammie into another bedroom, and I would sleep with Grampa. We would play a game—whoever goes to sleep first say, “I.” He would always win!

Grammie Randall, too, was a sweetheart. I never heard her use a curse word either. She did so much for my family. When Paul, my brother, broke both legs, she had him stay at her house. She bought my parents an automatic washer when the twins were born. She was always baking and mending our things, too. We could go to Grammie’s at any time. Though that was a time that “love” was never spoken, there was such a feeling of love in that home. I think Grampa said it best after she died, “She was a wonderful wife, a wonderful Mother, and a wonderful Grandmother.” I only hoped she knew it. We never told her just how wonderful she was.

When my cousin Dale called Grammie “Grammie,” I was so mad! How dare he call my Grandmother “Grammie?” My jealousy was stupid. Of course he would call her “Grammie.” That’s all he ever heard us call her.

When I think of Grammie Randall, I think of her as a modern grandmother. Sure, she did a lot of things that were a throwback to her time – like baking bread, making quilts and canning, but she would also go to our basketball games and cheer us on. For a while she even worked outside the home.

We didn’t know just how lucky my family was to have two full sets of wonderful grandparents.

 

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Danville Post Office Dedication Video, April 18, 2015

A video of the Dedication of the Danville Post Office, naming it after Thaddeus Stevens, is posted on YouTube at the following link: Danville Post Office Dedication. It was posted by Ross Hetrick, President of the Thaddeus Stevens Society.

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David Book presentation was riveting

The Society hosted David Book on Sunday, April 26. It was well-attended and worthwhile. The Vermont Humanities Speaker’s Bureau has a good one here; if you ever have a chance to hear his portrayal of Abel Morrill, a farmer in Cabot, it is worth the time. Liz Sargent took photos and we’ll share some of them here.

Photos of Abel Morrill's (David Book) two sons, who were both killed in Civil War in 1864.

Photos of Abel Morrill’s (David Book) two sons, who were both killed in Civil War in 1864.

Abel Morrill (David Book) reading the last words from his son's Bible.

Abel Morrill (David Book) reading the last words from his son’s Bible.

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Program on Sunday, April 26, 1:00 Choate-Sias House in Danville

We are pleased to host David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill. With just a rocking chair as a prop, he shares how one family, the Morrill’s, were affected by the Civil War. He writes, “There is nothing that I would like more than to share my historical monologue with the Danville Historical Society, because the people I portray are Danville people.”

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Thaddeus Stevens Post Office renaming program

Click the link below to see the program.

Click the link below to see the program.

FINAL PROGRAM w BG (1)

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Annual Meeting and Program

This should be an interesting program--Gary Aubin is an expert and wonderful speaker. Join us.

This should be an interesting program–Gary Aubin is an expert and wonderful speaker. Join us.

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Nature trail guide—Greenbank’s Hollow Historic Park

By Dave Houston

A field-use trail guide for the Greenbank’s Hollow Nature Trail is available at the Historical Park. However, the following description contains added detail and photos (click on photos and figures to enlarge). Even so, this is a work in progress as more information will be included as it becomes available.

Examples of things to come:

  • Lists, descriptions and photos where appropriate, of plants and animals found here along the trail or surrounding area, including birds, mammals, amphibians and  reptiles, and insects, as well as other biota such as fungi and archaea.
  • Detailed descriptions and location (map) of the soils present here, including their suitability for supporting plants, etc.
  • Information related to Joe’s Brook including seasonal flow data, water chemistry, suitability for fish habitat, and historical use of water power.
  • Additional geological details concerning the origin, formation and characteristics of the bedrock beneath the Park.
  • The influence of the bedrock and the last glaciation on the shape of our landscape and the soils that blanket it.

THE SETTING:

Joe's Brook as it comes tumbling down just below the bridge.

Joe’s Brook as it comes tumbling down just below the bridge.

Geology

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